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I’ve mentioned before that a people who uses those terms in the same sentence don’t know what they’re talking about, generally.

Generally boosting your immune system also means you will contribute to inflammation.

But some kinds of immune boosting are not as harmful and can actually  reduce inflammation in the long term.

This would the case if for example if they prevent infections from making you sick or inhibit viral infections like EBV, which can lead to autoimmune disease.

Anyway, I decided to visit SBM and stir some trouble up, because they come off as arrogant to me.   So I read the most recent post that came up.

Crislip says this:

Avoid any product that can “boost your immune system”

While it sounds impressive, the immune system cannot be boosted. When it is, in medicine we call it the inflammatory response, and is not without risk: stokes, heart attacks, and pulmonary emboli often occur after infections, probably as inflammation increases the rate of clot formation. (R)

This is very simplistic.   This paragraph makes you believe there’s a 1 to 1 ratio of immune boosting and inflammation, and that’s far from the truth.

Some types of immune boosting can be much less inflammatory than other kinds of immune boosting.

Vitamin D is a good example, but certainly not the only one, which can be considered ‘immune boosting’ and also ‘anti-inflammatory’.

This is misleading a bit, but so is Crislip’s statement.  I wouldn’t say what Crislip says or mention immune boosting and anti-inflammatory in the same sentence.   I’d  expect more from an infectious disease professor.

Some general ideas:

  • You can boost the immune in response to an infectious agent, but lower base levels of cytokines.
  • You can boost ‘immune readiness’, without actually activating it.
  • You can boost less harmful aspects of the immune system that also play a very significant role in preventing infection, but aren’t so damaging to the body.
  • You can boost the immune system in one area, but not in others.

Vitamin D’s Anti-inflammatory role:

  • Inhibits B cell proliferation
  • Blocks B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion
  • Suppresses T cell proliferation
  • Results in a shift from a Th1 to a Th2 phenotype
  • Inhibits Th17 phenotype
  • Induces T regulatory cells
  • Decreased production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-17, IL-21)
  • Increased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10.
  • inhibits monocyte production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and TNFα
  • Inhibits DC differentiation and maturation with preservation of an immature phenotype as evidenced by a decreased expression of MHC class II molecules, co-stimulatory molecules, and IL12. (R)

Vitamin D also boosts the immune system:

This is not a complete picture of how vitamin D is working, but it’s enough to demonstrate a point.

The overall effect of modulating the immune system in this way?

Vitamin D can help prevent the flu (R).   It can also help prevent autoimmune disease and various types of inflammation.

I am not aware of any studies that show an increased likelihood of infection or illness.

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3 COMMENTS

  • Kim

    A lot of time Weak right brain co-insides with methylation problems, copper overload and vitamin D deficiency. Their is a really good book by a Dr William Wash called “Nutrient Power” It is fantastic! Between that book and the one by the founder of “brain balance achievement centers” (Robert Melilla). You should be able to find some things that will help you.

  • Kim

    I have researched this too and this is what I have found. You most likely have a weak right brain. When you are sick the right brain is where part of the immune system is regulated so it is stimulated when you are sick because your immune system is working to get you better. This results in both sides of your brain being balanced (until you are better anyway). To get a stronger right brain there are certain things you can do that over time will strengthen your right brain so that it is more up to the level with your left. This will also help both sides of your brain be able to communicate with each other. Check out “Brain balance achievement centers” They don’t treat adults, but there is lots of good info there and things you can do at home. There is also a book about it that was written by the Doctor who started the centers…

  • John

    Hi Joe

    Whenever I get a cold or virus I feel fantastic. My head feels clear and my speech fluency and thoughts flow like they should. I am happy and feel sociable and connected to the world.

    But this only lasts a few weeks I guess while my body is fighting off the infection.

    Then I go back to my old depressed slow thinking self!

    I wonder what’s going on here and how I can mimic this feeling. I have tried hundreds of supplements in the past and never have been able to feel like I do when I’m sick.

    Any thoughts on what could be happening?

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