Health Benefits of Red Yeast Rice

lovastatin

The ferment, like yogurt or cheese, Red Yeast Rice is where we isolate a certain cholesterol-lowering substance, a statin – lovastatin (R). Red Yeast Rice can be brewed into sake, vinegar, wine, and food pickling or used simply for its red color (R).

It has been shown Red Yeast Rice lowers cholesterol, lowers high blood pressure, lowers inflammation, lowers blood sugar, prevents cancer and increases bone growth (R).

Read More

Bromantane’s 25 Benefits

bigstock-Transparent-human-head-with-a--157904882-min

Bromantane, or Ladasten, is a chemical made by Russians in the 80s from amantadine combined with bromobenzene [R] and is good enough to be banned in the Olympics since 1996.

Bromantane is widely used in Russia for performance enhancing and for anti-inflammation [R] and is well-known for maintaining a high working capacity [R] and to shorten recovery times after exercise [R].
Read More

45 Benefits Of Pycnogenol (Pine Bark Extract)

bigstock-Pine-Tree-1294339-min

I have been vaporizing an oil form of Pine Bark Extract for 2 years now since I found out about its anti-cancer and anti-infection effects – two important points for longevity – and noticed the ease of breathing while walking through a pine forest. It can also lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and reduce free radical damage.

This article will summarize the reference supported findings of the scientific research surrounding Pine Bark Extract constituents, first in regards to conditions of illness and in normal healthy situations and then in a technical mechanism response.

Read More

13 Ways Vinpocetine Can Improve Your Health And Brain Power

vinpocetine

Vinpocetine is a well-known nootropic in the health-hacking community that has a variety of health benefits. For example, vinpocetine is used to increase brain circulation, alertness, cognitive function, concentration, memory and mood, and lower inflammation and oxidative stress.

This article will explore vinpocetine’s history, how it works, it’s possible health benefits, and any possible safety issues you should consider before taking it.

Read More

Copper Part 1: The Good and Bad of Copper, and Ways to Increase or Decrease Your Copper Absorption

bigstock--128964434-min

Copper is an important trace mineral. We need it for normal growth, bone strength, immune function, and cardiovascular health. However, too much of it can be toxic. Read this post to learn more about the health benefits of copper, harmful effects of copper overload, and ways to change your copper absorption.

Read More

19 Reasons Why High Homocysteine is Bad, and Natural Ways to Decrease It

screen-shot-2017-01-01-at-09-08-08

High homocysteine is linked to many health problems including heart disease, stroke, autoimmune disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease.

This post describes:

  • How homocysteine levels can affect your health
  • How homocysteine can be toxic and inflammatory
  • Lab tests for homocysteine levels, with optimal ranges
  • Factors that influence homocysteine levels, including diet, lifestyle, and ways to support the methylation pathways given the relevant genetic information (i.e. MTHFR mutation)
  • How you can optimize your homocysteine levels to improve your performance and wellbeing.

Read More

What Doctors Won’t Tell You About Low or High Ferritin in Your Blood Test

bigstock-128949731-min

Ferritin stores iron and transports it to where it is required. In blood, it is an important indicator of the total iron stores. However, ferritin also participates in infections, inflammation, and malignancies. Elevated ferritin is often found in disorders with chronic inflammatory states such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Find out why it is important to keep this protein in balance, and which factors increase or decrease ferritin levels.

Read More

All about HbA1c and 33 Reasons to Maintain Healthy HbA1c Levels (Part 1)

bigstock-127844927-min

HbA1c is an indicator of long-term glucose levels and has been recommended for diagnosing diabetes by the American Diabetes Association. Increased HbA1c in nondiabetics, apart from being a risk factor for diabetes, is also associated with cardiovascular disease and elevated all-cause mortality. Ideally, you would want to keep your HbA1c low, but also stable. Read on to find out why, and to learn about all the factors that can help you improve your HbA1c levels.

Read More