How to overcome insomnia and optimize your sleep to heal from chronic health problems

If you struggle with fatigue, brain fog, or other inflammatory health problems, it doesn’t matter how many supplements or hacks you use if you can’t fix your sleep.

50% of SelfHacked Clients and from our reader survey suffer from insomnia or poor sleep quality. We find that insomnia has an 80% correlation with brain fog, anxiety, and depression.

Because sleep is so important for healing these health problems, we wrote a book Biohacking Insomnia. It is on sale for $27 for the next 2 weeks. Afterwards, the price will increase to $37.

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Dr. Gundry: Lectins are the Root Cause of Inflammation and Disease

In this podcast interview, Dr. Gundry exposes the dangerous truth behind lectins and how they relate to inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and obesity. Most importantly, he shares his vast experience and research on why lectins are so harmful to the body, and how to reverse the damages they cause.

Anyone who reads SelfHacked knows I am very ‘anti-lectin’ for people with autoimmune/inflammatory issues. Dr. Gundry, originally a very famous heart surgeon, discovered how dangerous lectins are and altered his career to help people reverse autoimmune disease through his matrix diet. He has completed the only human study related to lectins and is now the most knowledgeable on the subject. His second book “the Plant Paradox” is coming out on April 25th, 2017.

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All About Histamine: The Good and The Bad

Histamine is widely known as a substance that contributes to allergies, asthma, eczema, and coughs.

In addition, histamine is also a neurotransmitter with very important roles both in the brain and in the gut. Read this post to learn more about histamine.

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H. pylori Infection 101: Natural Factors that Combat H. pylori (Part 2)

Standard antibiotic therapy for H. pylori have eradication success rate of under 60%, with several long-term side effects. This post (Part 2) covers how natural nutrients and supplements can lower the rate of H. pylori colonization, reduce symptoms of infections, and improve the outcome of standard antibiotic therapy. Read this post to learn how you can help your body combat H. pylori naturally.

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H. pylori Infection 101: H. pylori Facts and Associated Diseases (Part 1)

It is estimated that more than half of the population is a host for Helicobacter pylori.  While most will show no symptoms, in others this bacterium can lead to chronic stomach inflammation and ulcers. H. pylori infection also exacerbates a number of autoimmune and inflammation-related diseases but may confer protection in other conditions.  Read on to find out when and why H. pylori infection should be treated.

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How to Increase NAD+: The Molecule of Youth (and the danger of low NAD+)

NAD+ has many important roles for health, including stimulating anti-aging activities of Sirtuins and the DNA damage repair enzymes.

High NAD+ is necessary for healthy metabolism and mitochondria. In addition, low NAD+ can contribute to fatigue and several diseases. Read this post to learn more about NAD+ and factors that increase or decrease it.

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Hidden Causes of Low or High Ferritin – and How to Increase or Decrease It

Ferritin stores iron and transports it to where it is required. In blood, it is an important indicator of the total iron stores. However, ferritin also participates in infections, inflammation, and malignancies. Elevated ferritin is often found in disorders with chronic inflammatory states such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Find out why it is important to keep this protein in balance, and which factors increase or decrease ferritin levels.

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24 Scientifically Proven Health Benefits of Ginger (with References and Risks)

Ginger has been revered as a culinary and medicinal spice in many traditional cultures. It is also a very powerful herb with numerous proven health benefits. Read this post to learn more about ginger and how to make the best use of ginger for your health.

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Top 17 Negative Health Effects of Environmental Pollution (#4 will surprise you)

To live in the 21st century is to live in a toxic world. Rapid urbanization and the increased burning of fossil fuels over the past century has made people more susceptible than ever to harmful chemicals in the air, soil, and water including carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, and endocrine disrupting chemicals.

These pollutants increase the risk of many chronic illnesses such as cancer, heart disease, and lung disease, making it a significant global health problem.

Conditions linked to everyday chemicals—used in cosmetics, plastics and common household items like sofas—lead to $340 billion in treatment and lost productivity costs annually in the U.S. (R).

Controlled studies show that when you pump in volatile organic compounds and carbon dioxide in the air to levels that are within the range of normal and found in office environments (the worst 25% of offices), many important parameters of cognition go down dramatically (R).

The magnitude of effects from breathing cleaner air are greater than any nootropic you may be taking. Cognitive scores were 101% better when there was lower volatile organic compounds and carbon dioxide levels (R).

Read more to learn about the detrimental effects of pollution and environmental toxins on human health.

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Glucocorticoid Receptors: Gateways to Control Your Levels of Stress, Inflammation, and Anxiety

Glucocorticoid receptors are a type of receptors on the outside of our cells that transmit signals from glucocorticoids, such as cortisol. Poor glucocorticoid receptor function due to chronic stress and high CRH can lead to cortisol resistance, which explains why stress can worsen health problems and cause weight gain. Read this post to learn more about glucocorticoid receptors and how to optimize its function.

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Everything You Need to Know about the C-reactive Protein (CRP)

CRP plays an important role in infections. However, this protein is also a marker of low-grade inflammation and a predictor of your cardiovascular disease risk. Find out how this protein links stress, emotional and socioeconomic cues to physiological ones, and how to keep your CRP levels at bay.

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