CYP11B2 Enzyme & Aldosterone: Function & Gene Variants

Written by Biljana Novkovic, PhD | Last updated:

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CYP11B2 produces the hormone aldosterone, which helps conserve sodium. Through its effect on sodium, aldosterone can affect blood pressure. Also, when dysfunctional, aldosterone can contribute to the development of heart disease. That is why some CYP11B2 gene variants are associated with elevated blood pressure and heart disease risk. In this post, you will find out more about gene variants and factors that increase or decrease CYP11B2 activity.

About the Author

Biljana Novkovic

Biljana Novkovic

PhD
Biljana received her PhD from Hokkaido University.
Before joining SelfHacked, she was a research scientist with extensive field and laboratory experience. She spent 4 years reviewing the scientific literature on supplements, lab tests and other areas of health sciences. She is passionate about releasing the most accurate science and health information available on topics, and she's meticulous when writing and reviewing articles to make sure the science is sound. She believes that SelfHacked has the best science that is also layperson-friendly on the web.