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What is C60 Oil (Fullerene)? + Risks

Written by Joe Cohen, BS | Last updated:
Jonathan Ritter
Medically reviewed by
David Harrington, MD, Jonathan Ritter, PharmD, PhD (Pharmacology) | Written by Joe Cohen, BS | Last updated:
Woman

C60 is still relatively new, with only limited studies. C60 oil showed promising antioxidant and lifespan-increasing effects in rats and dishes. However, early studies show it may also induce DNA mutations. What’s more, C60 completely lacks clinical trials. Read on for a breakdown of available science behind C60.

Disclaimer: Clinical studies have yet to determine the effectiveness and safety of C60. Thus, C60 has a high potential for harm, with unknown risks and side effects. We suggest against supplementat/.

 

ion until proper clinical trials determine the effectiveness and safety profile of this substance.

What is C60?

New Antioxidant

Buckminsterfullerene, buckyballs, or C60 is a powerful antioxidant that has effects on unsaturated fats. it removes superoxide, which is a toxic by-product of cellular metabolism that contributes to tissue injury in many human diseases [1].

A review of scientific research concluded that C60 early research holds some promise. The compound had longevity and antioxidant effects in animals and cells. However, it’s still far too soon to draw any conclusions from such limited data [2].

The proposed mechanism indicates that C60 has the ability to acquire positive charge by absorbing protons; this complex could enter the mitochondria, leading to a decrease in reactive oxygen species production [3].

Computer simulations have shown that C60 has the ability to pass through lipid membranes, enter the cell, and alter its functions [4].

Some C60 derivatives that are produced in the body are water-soluble and apparently non-toxic below concentrations of 1 mg/mL [5].

According to preliminary research, C60 appears to be an antioxidant that removes toxic metabolic waste and free radicals. Further research is needed.

Snapshot

Proponents

  • May promote longevity
  • May reduce oxidative stress and inflammation
  • Kills microbes
  • Shields the skin and nerve cells

Skeptics

  • May cause DNA mutations
  • Not studied in humans at all
  • Side effects profile and interactions unknown
  • High potential for harm
  • Both short- and long-term safety is unknown

C60 Research

1) May Promote Longevity

Carboxyl C60 prevented nerve cell death from dehydration or amyloid-beta plaques (cause Alzheimer’s) and allowed mice to live 8 days longer in a 120-day lifetime [6, 7].

Another study found that average lifespan can increase 5-14% even when starting halfway through the lives of mice [8, 9].

The above studies used a derivative of C60 while using the real thing in olive oil (1.7 mg/kg, 2x a month) can produce a 90% increase in rats’ lifespan [10].

However, it’s completely uncertain if C60 has any effect on human lifespan. Many compounds that initially seem to increase the lifespan of lab animals turn out to be ineffective in humans.

C60 prevented nerve damage and increased lifespan in rats and mice. These findings have not been confirmed in humans.

2) Antioxidant & Anti-inflammatory Properties

An antioxidant like carboxyl prevented age-related decline in mice [11, 12].

Carboxy C60 is significantly better than ubiquinone in preventing fat peroxidation and iron-induced oxidation in cells [12].

Also, malonyl-C60 inhibits nitric oxide synthase, a creator of nitric oxide, in test-tubes [13].

By inhibiting IL-1, matrix metalloproteinases, and TNF-alpha, hydroxyl-C60 prevents inflammation in mice [14].

Water-soluble C60 prevents stress-induced damage and the breakdown of bones. It also prevents the loss of bone cells and bone inflammation in rabbits [15].

In animal and cell studies, C60 prevented age- and stress-related bone loss by fighting inflammation and oxidative damage. More research is needed.

3) Anti-Microbial Properties

When the right kind of photons work with hydroxy C60 it can deactivate mosquito viruses [16].

Also, malonyl C60 killed Group A Streptococcus, which causes strep throat, skin infections, and toxic shock syndrome [17].

4) Neuroprotective Properties

Hydroxyl C60 protects nerves from dying due to overwork in cell cultures [18].

5) Prevents UV Damage

Perfect for incorporating into a skin lotion, C60 Oil stops sunburn in models of human skin [19].

In test tubes, C60 was able to kill microbes, protect nerves, and prevent skin UV damage.

C60 Risks

Side Effects & Safety Findings

In rats, high doses didn’t affect body fat, protein, sugar, and other molecules [20].

C60 oil caused DNA damage in rats, changing the DNA expression of the lungs and liver [21].

Additionally, sister chromatid exchange and micronucleation occur more often from C60 — this can be a source of DNA mutation [22].

Even though a study on injecting live mice brains with carboxy fullerene suggested it could be useful in preventing stroke, 20% of the mice that were injected with too much died [23].

Human studies on C60 are lacking, so we don’t know much about its potential side effects and safety profile.

C60 was relatively safe in animal trials. However, it may cause DNA damage. Human safety studies on C60 are lacking.

C60 Oil is best dissolved in oil with a centrifuge. Pure C60 and high doses of dissolved C60 can be toxic [24].

 

Takeaway

Early animal and cell-based studies suggest fullerene (buckminsterfullerene or C60) may be an antioxidant that removes toxic metabolic waste. According to these early studies, C60 may promote longevity and reduce oxidative stress. However, it showed the potential to damage DNA. Additionally, fullerene has not yet been studied in humans. Thus, its short- and long-term risk and safety profile remain unknown. We recommend against taking this compound until proper clinical trials are completed.

About the Author

Joe Cohen, BS

Joe Cohen, BS

Joe Cohen won the genetic lottery of bad genes. As a kid, he suffered from inflammation, brain fog, fatigue, digestive problems, anxiety, depression, and other issues that were poorly understood in both conventional and alternative medicine. Frustrated by the lack of good information and tools, Joe decided to embark on a journey of self-experimentation and self-learning to improve his health--something that has since become known as “biohacking”. With thousands of experiments and pubmed articles under his belt, Joe founded SelfHacked, the resource that was missing when he needed it. SelfHacked now gets millions of monthly readers. Joe is a thriving entrepreneur, author and speaker. He is the CEO of SelfHacked, SelfDecode and LabTestAnalyzer. His mission is to help people gain access to the most up-to-date, unbiased, and science-based ways to optimize their health.
Joe has been studying health sciences for 17 years and has read over 30,000 PubMed articles. He's given consultations to over 1000 people who have sought his health advice. After completing the pre-med requirements at university, he founded SelfHacked because he wanted to make a big impact in improving global health. He's written hundreds of science posts, multiple books on improving health, and speaks at various health conferences. He's keen on building a brain-trust of top scientists who will improve the level of accuracy of health content on the web. He's also founded SelfDecode and LabTestAnalyzer, popular genetic and lab software tools to improve health.

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